Computer Repair Advices and How To Find A Computer Shop

Computer issues can be tricky. Sometimes they can just happen without any warning. Issues may arise due to a power surge, a hardware failure, a virus, etc. We strongly believe that anyone should have a backup system in place. Either you opt to subscribe to an online backup system, or you just buy an external hard drive and set it up, one should always have a backup. Computers being cheaper, you can most of the times buy a new computer, instead of spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars on a computer repair service. Sometimes a computer hardware failure can take place and the computer can still run. This is one of those tricky situations, just because computer can crush at any given time. When this happens it is still very important to fix the issue promptly. Ask a savvy friend or just visit a computer repair shop. Nowadays, many computer service center offer free diagnosis.

In other cases, a hardware failure is so obvious, that there is no doubt you need to visit a computer shop (lines all over screen, computer doesn’t turn on, hard drive makes strange noises, etc). A virus is also something you should be aware of. We advice everyone should have an antivirus system in place. Yes, ONE! Not two or three or more! One antivirus is enough! Some viruses are more than obvious, popping up on your screen anytime you try to do something. These viruses are very annoying, but at least we know that the computer is infected and actions needs to be takes as soon as possible. Most of the computer shops can fix this problem.

In some other cases, a slow notebook or PC is one sign that you may need to have your computer checked for viruses. It may be also if you see a blue screen and have to reboot several times when running certain software.

For anyone that’s not sure about how much something may cost when it comes to a PC problem — it’s easy to get an estimate. This way you know what it’s going to cost you and when to expect repairs to be done. Something that may be very important when you are running your own business or simply rely on your PC on a day to day basis.

Computer repair shops are valuable to all of us as technology continues to consume our lives. It is important that you look into finding a reliable computer repair shop in your area that is reasonable, fair and able to explain to you what is happening with your PC. If they are of little help check the web. Don’t be fooled by sites that are littered with technical jargon and tons of corporate testimonials. When looking for PC repair you need a middle ground. Someone who is professional, technical and that can relate to any computer user. Make sure you are happy with the service you have received and the explanations that have been given. This way you stay in control of the service and can make sure that the computer has been repaired and you understand what was done. Once you find a reliable computer shop, you will always these people for any computer related issues.

Improving University Technology Transfer Outreach Efforts by Using Social Media

Technology transfer and licensing are integral to business creation and growth in the US. The push is on in the US to create more jobs, and largely through creating new companies, and expanding small-to-midcap businesses, especially those whose classic markets, such as services, are in upheaval as evidenced in the Federal Government services contractor community.

Historically, small businesses hire more people than large businesses. With so many new technologies available for development support, such as cloud computing and an expanding suite of SaaS offerings, the cost of infrastructure – often a major background cost to a firm – can be more effectively planned, budgeted and managed. This also saves time and energy in start-ups.

While the primary sources for licensable technology in the US are commercial entities, universities, and internal Federal Labs and Federally funded labs in academia, universities have the broadest array of commercializable technology, and the best ecosystems for support of spinouts/new starts.

Local spinouts/new starts are of importance since they bring jobs to the local economy. A university on the east coast would like the spinout in its back yard, not in California or Oregon, for example. The difference can be extremely significant in economic value — licensee fees and royalties of x value for a licensee based in and commercializing the licensed technology in California for example, versus jobs and all the flow-down economic impact of having that company in the back yard on the east coast.

But in surveying the university marketing landscape there seems to be a lack of effective outreach and marketing programs by the universities. Many have a pull approach — excellent sites, on-line databases of licensable technology, excellent reports on their achievements… but often little visibility. You have to know where to go to find the information. Of course, push and pull marketing and sales are relative to where you are standing and your point of view, but generally, the university’s name, reputation, and prior work are the pull. Yes, many universities attend technology and innovation events, and you can search sites, or even a patent portal. But it is still pull marketing.

In fact, looking at 200 universities` web sites, not a single one had technology transfer on the home page by mention or link you had to look to find it. I randomly looked at several universities Face book pages, and not a single one emphasized its technology transfer programs or achievements.

At the Customer 360 conference in LA, Gartner Group projected the impact of social media on customer relationship management — essentially marketing/sales. The impact on firms without social media programs is significant. Since technology transfer IS a very real multi-billion/year business, it ought to be a cornerstone in universities’ efforts, if not already implemented or planned.